The Real Green Monster of Fenway: Game 1

Redsox vs. Yankees – August 9th, 2016

It was a clear but humid night that the Boston Red Sox began their three game series against the New York Yankees, and Alex Rodriguez was set to play one of his final games as a Yankee. Let me tell you, the paparazzi was out in full force. Meanwhile, the Green Team was working behind the scenes to recycle as much as they could in Fenway Park. The Green Team that night was made up of eight volunteers from Epsilon, a environmentally-conscious marketing firm, and myself.

Once the bags were handed out by a Red Sox staff member, and everyone had their free hot dog voucher, we split. I went straight to the center field bleachers to start my slow winding descent around the stadium. “Don’t forget to give me your total before you go!” I called back at Linda, a Director at Epsilon, who jokingly called herself the “Recycling Nazi.”

The sweat was flowing freely by the 5th inning when I went up to the balcony to get an aerial photo of Loge Box 159, the section I would later sample to get a baseline estimate of the number of potential bags of recycling in the stadium. See methodology section for quick explanation. 

Chase Headley, the Yankees third baseman swatted a line drive off the Green Monster, which took an odd carom off the wall, crossing up Red Sox center fielder Jackie Bradley Jr.. Headley was digging for a triple when JBJ managed to recover and make a throw that was right on the money, nailing him at third. Headley couldn’t believe it, and was taking his sweet time getting back to the dugout. This must have pissed off Rick Porcello, the Red Sox’s starting pitcher, so he yelled a few choice words at him to hurry it up. Headley, a normally mellow fellow, didn’t like it, and began angrily walking in Porcello’s direction before both benches cleared and he was intercepted by a teammate. I took a short break to watch the drama unfold, and it stirred a passion inside me. Who doesn’t love a good heated rivalry of sports like the Yankees and Red Sox? Now, if only there was a way to provoke the same passion inside people to protect the earth’s environment. As much as I love baseball, a game where you hit a ball with a stick should not be a stronger motivator of feelings than the quality of one’s own ecosystem.

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Also, something funny I overheard at the game…

(Usher addressing a guy who looks lost): Can I help you?

Guy: Yeah are you a therapist?

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Finally, the game was nearly over, and I couldn’t find anybody from Epsilon! I had collected 30 bags on my own, which was a personal record, but barely a drop in the bucket considering that the game had been nearly sold out and fans had consumed a lot. I was hoping that Linda and her crew had picked up the slack. Luckily, the next day I connected with her on Linkedin, and she told me that the Epsilon team had collected 14 bags. Not bad for their first timers. That put our total at 44 bags of recycling collected for the night. Here’s a link to an explanation of the following stats and how they’re calculated.

Weather: Hot and humid                                                                 Date: 8/9/16
# of bags collected as a team

44

Contamination Errors

0

Final # of bags

44

# of bags collected in sampled section after the game

1.5

# of people sitting in sampled section during the game

99

Attendance at game

38,089

Estimated total # of bags in stadium

577.1

Team Bagging Average

0.076

Pretty dismal if you were talking about a player’s Batting Average, but not entirely bad for a rag-tag group of recyclers. It’s a start anyways. Next, how efficient was I collecting?

# of steps walked 14,394
# of individual bags collected 30
Scavenger Efficiency Rate (steps per bag) 479.8 

Around 500 steps per bag seems pretty efficient to me, but then again we don’t have anything to compare it to. I bet Ichiro could get 30 bags in under 10,000 steps. Pre-game stretching is definitely recommended!

2016 Green Team Season Totals

Season total (less contaminated bags)
44 bags
 –
Season total CO2 equivalent savings
0.70 mt
Equivalent to:
Miles driven in an average passenger vehicle
1,666
Untitled
Gallons of gasoline consumed
78.2
sfdf
Pounds of coal burned
782
                         coal
Propane cylinders used for home barbecues
28.4
                          dfdf
Incandescent lamps switched to LEDs
24.6
                         led
Barrels of oil consumed
1.6
oil
Tree seedlings grown for ten years
18
adfsdf

Methodology behind these numbers

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The author of this post and leading participant of the Red Sox Green Team, is Charlie Pioli; a recent graduate from Northeastern University with a B.S. in Economics and an unhealthy passion for the environment. He believes recycling is a huge boon for the earth, but far from the answer to solving the worldwide waste problem. 

Check out his Twitter or Linkedin profiles for more information about him.

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3 thoughts on “The Real Green Monster of Fenway: Game 1

  1. What an awesome thing! It makes me curious if other ball parks (like our local double A team) do this. Keep up the amazing work and spreading the word. Thanks for sharing on the #WasteLessWednesday blog hop!

    Like

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